Sunday, April 28, 2013

Elsewhere in cyberspace...

I've had to take a few weeks off from blogging to get caught up with other real life responsibilities... and now is the time of that year that the fishing starts to heat up and the snakes begin crawling out of hibernation- two things that are serious distractions for the fishing snake guy.

I've had a guest blog post appear on the Pelican Products blog. It's all about snake safety in the outdoors. It's got a few of the same highlights as my popular "Springtime is Snake Time" post... but I toned it down a bit for a more general audience. Here is a link to the post- "The Return of the Snakes: Common Sense and Safety." Please go check it out, and leave your comments while you're there.

If any of you follow the Fly Fishing Ventures blog, you may have recognized a familiar face featured in the latest installment of "Women in Fly Fishing." Kelly is really the first of the WIFF who is a warmwater fly fisher. I just want to say "Thanks" to Rebecca for featuring my favorite fishing partner and showing some love for the dark warmwater side of our sport.

11 comments:

  1. Excellent articles on both counts, Jay. Great stuff.

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    1. Thanks, Ty. I liked your tip you left on the snake post.

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  2. Jay
    Enjoyed all the articles, not one to love snakes though---I really enjoyed the article about Kelly, she sometimes reminds me of my daughter, Jenny who grew up fishing with me. By the way the top water action is heating up on the lake, let me know when it would be a good time for you guys to fish up this way. Thanks for sharing the articles

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    1. Bill,
      I'm glad you enjoyed the articles. My weekends have been pretty busy as of late, and don't look to clear up anytime soon... but maybe I/we can join you on a weekday?

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  3. Jay
    Next week is not good for me ---but the following weeks ahead would work--let me know when you would like to meet and I will see if our schedules work out.

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  4. Jay, you've been missed but I was happy to read about Kelly on FFV. Thanks also for my snake fix.

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    1. Sorry I haven't really given you a good visual fix yet. I'll have to get some snake photos up soon... 'tis the season. I guess your Bullsnakes and Prairie Rattlers are still hibernating though.

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  5. What gets me is how those snakes hide in bushes hanging out over the water. I saw a couple of them courting/mating in some weeds on the edge of the stream - standing up intertwined about a foot and a half up in the water. Amazing!

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    1. Josh,
      If they were hanging in bushes over the water, they were almost guaranteed to be non-venomous. The venomous Cottonmouth or Water Moccasin doesn't often hang out in shrubs... maybe a big downed tree or log, but they're big and heavy bodied and need a big branch to support them. There are two species of non-venomous watersnakes that love to hang out in shrubs that overhang the edge of a creek- the Midland Watersnake (Nerodia sipedon pleuralis) and the Queen Snake (Regina septemvittata). The Queen Snake would be a bit rarer in AR, but the Midland should be in just about every stream in the state. Midland are typically reddish brown in overall appearance with a series of blotches on their backs and sides. Queen snakes would appear mostly dark grey or black. Midlands eat small fish and frogs like you would expect a watersnake might, but Queen snakes only eat freshy molted crayfish... a pretty unusual and specialized diet for snake.
      Thanks for the comment.

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  6. Jay If you get some time I stumbled across a fish that I have never seen before. I took a short movie of it and put a link in my post Maries River after work. Take a look and let me know what the heck that thing is?

    Good post on the Snakes. Came a cross my first one of the year a few weeks a go. A big fat brown common water snake crossing the river.

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    1. Took a look and it appears to be a Northern Brook Lamprey (Ichthyomyzon fossor). I left a comment on the video as well.

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