Saturday, June 30, 2012

More fun with Featherlights

Kelly and I were recently featured in a post on The Fiberglass Manifesto entitled "Fun with Featherlights...and Snakes." Today we had a little more fun with Featherlights on our local creek, and we also witnessed a pretty interesting interaction between a bass and a snake.

We thought for a second that the bass was considering eating the small Midland Watersnake, but apparently it was just guarding a nest and chasing away a potential predator. It's pretty cool to see things like that in nature... especially when you find "nature" smack dab in the middle of a completely developed urban area. Enjoying nature is my primary motivation for going fishing.

This may be a first here on The Naturalist's Angle, but today I returned to my roots and fished with my Featherlight spinning rod. I was recently given a huge lot of plastic worms and such (much, much more about that later), and I was itching to get out and fish a "Texas-rigged" worm.

My Featherlight spinning rod is an ultralight so I chose a small 4" worm, a size 1 worm hook, and a 1/16 oz bullet worm weight. This is an ideal set up for fishing small stream bass if you must use something other than a fly rod.

A spinning rod? I thought this was a fly fishing blog.


While I fished the worm, Kelly stuck to her gun... her lucky Featherlight fly rod.


I'm pretty sure I'll lure her to at least try the dark side soon enough, but as long as she catches just as many on poppers as I do on plastic worms it will be hard to make the case. There was no clear winner today as we both caught several bass (Largemouths and Spotteds) and none over a pound.

It was really hot out there this evening. It felt like we were wading through warm bath water, and the air felt like a sauna. The high temp was 104 in Birmingham today. When we got back to the car at 9 PM, the thermometer was still reading 96. I've heard a lot of people say it's just too hot to fish, but if you'll just wait 'til the sun gets behind the trees... those hot fish and their high metabolism have to eat.

Stay cool out there, and get out to enjoy some evening fishing action.

8 comments:

  1. I'm thinking that Kelly looks bored...haha. Maybe she is catching just too many fish these days! Now, that 9 pm time sounds just about right for hot days... don't blame you one bit! I go the opposite way...and start early in the morning until it gets too warm!

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    1. RD, early mornings are always an option, and probably the way most fishermen try to beat the heat... but in my experience the evening action seems to last just a little longer than the morning bite. It also feels too much like work if I get up really early on a weekend. Kelly's just bored of catching all those mediocre fish... she has high expectations. I've tried to tell her she can't expect to catch a hawg every time we go out.

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  2. Jay
    I thought you guys had found a good way to combat the heat in the Birmingham area but you proved me wrong. I made the mistake the other day and suited up in my waders at the tailrace to fish and was wet by the time I got to the water, so like you guys, I will opt for wet wading the rest of the summer months. What length rod is the featherlight?

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    1. Bill, the fly rod is 8' 6 wt and the spinning rod is 5'6"... or it at least it was at one time... it has a repaired tip so it's probably an inch short of original length.

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  3. Nice post, Kelly looks so enthused in that pic. ha!

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    1. There was also a photo that followed that one where she posed and smiled like usual with her fish. I opted to post the more candid unprepared photo however. I think it captures her lack of enthusiasm for such tiny little fish... she thinks they should all be lunkers based on her recent successes.

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  4. You just gotta work those runs and riffles. I've been kicking some tail all year. Each stream has its secrets. Not all streams are equal. Took me a long time to find a honey hole.

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    1. You're right about not all streams being equal. The ones that get too much fishing pressure are no fun. I think we've found the "honey holes" on the little stream in our neighborhood... but I think the neighborhood kids have found them too. Some days are really good, and other days are a bust... and that may be something we never really understand.
      Thanks for the comment.

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