Monday, March 12, 2012

Arkansas record Largemouth Bass FAIL

So... the new Arkansas state record Largemouth Bass was harvested illegally. The old record still stands.

Why? You might ask.

Was the fish caught using an illegal method... like dynamite?

Or some sort of "banned lure"?

No... and no. (At least not at the time of this writing, but there is some speculation that the fish was not actually caught in the manner described by Mr. Crowder.)

It seems Mr. Crowder failed to follow the most basic of "the rules." You see, in order to go out and catch a fish in Arkansas (or pretty much any other state), on land that you don't own, especially public land such as a state park, you generally will need a fishing license to make your catch legal.

Mr. Crowder apparently overlooked this minor detail.


You can read the above article from our local newspaper online. There's also a good article on the Field & Stream website.

Mr. Crowder's fish story may be the best cautionary tale that could ever be told about why you shouldn't try to fish without a license.

Some guys have all the luck... and none of the brains.

14 comments:

  1. Well Jay, I guess this gives Mr. Crowder bragging rights if he wants to carry that clipping around and embarrass himself.

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    1. He didn't seem to have any problem with embarrassing himself when he spoke with F&S.

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  2. He said he (and his kids) have been cited several times in the past for this same violation. I'm not saying I've never looked at my papers only to realize that I was a month overdue... but come on! How many times does this need to happen before it's a lesson learned?! I ALMOST feel bad for him.

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    1. No sympathy here, even though I admit that I've unknowingly gone fishing with an expired license. Part of my excuse is that I live in an area where I have had licenses in four states (AL, AR, MS, and TN)- all purchased at different times. My home state of Tennessee has set dates (March 1st to February 28th) for annual licenses where all the rest are one year from date of purchase. It's a lot to keep up with, but I suspect Mr. Crowder doesn't do much fishing far from home.

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  3. Something similar happened in Vermont with a protected Atlantic salmon. The angler brought it in to be officially weighed...Busted.
    That bass is a monster.

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    1. It's one thing if you're a bit ignorant about fish identification or the details of the law (like which fish are protected), but to not even have a license and then go fishing in a state park and pose for pics with a park ranger... what an idiot.

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  4. The sad thing is that a trophy fish had to die and it won't even get the recognition that it deserves. Although I suspect that the fish would have been kept even if he hadn't thought that it was a record breaker..just guessing.
    I say the fish is still a state record , just don't give the angler credit for catching it if done illegally.

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    1. I kinda feel like the fish should be considered a new record and the state fish & game commission could use the story to reiterate the need for proper licenses. It is sad that the fish and the state park will essentially get no credit because of Crowder's foolishness.

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  5. Funny, sad, hilarious, pathetic, and stupid - all at the same time. Any way you cut it though, tremendous fish.

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    1. It definitely runs the gamut of emotions and reactions. There is no denying it's an amazing fish. Maybe those lakes at village Creek should be high on the priority list.

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  6. Jay
    Just goes to show you how much some individuals care about true conservation when it come to protecting fisheries. I concur with one of your comments, in that it is a shame that this fish had to die for nothing. Thanks for sharing

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    1. It's really sad that in this day and age there are still those people out there who are willing to take advantage of the resource, but not even pay a few bucks for the license to do so legally. It's also sad that they have no understanding or appreciation for how fisheries management works and how it gets funded.

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