Sunday, May 15, 2011

Fun with Seed Beads

Went to the craft store this weekend and picked up some of these...

"Premium Japanese"... maybe I should be making Tenkara flies.

because I've been wanting to make a few of these...

 
I've never tried making (hard to call it "tying") any bead body flies before, but I'm pretty satisfied with the results of my first attempt. They're super simple, and if they actually catch any fish they'll be well worth the effort... which was minimal.

They tying is simply enough wraps of thread (behind the last bead) to keep the beads from sliding off and a couple of whip finishes. I cemented the thread wraps for durability. Most of what I "tied" are on size 12 scud hooks, but there are a couple size 16 in the mix. I think the size 16 are actually a bit too small for the beads. I found out the hard way that I'm currently out of size 14 hooks, but I think they would work pretty well.

I bought the lime green and red, but the rest of the colors I used were leftover from my mother's heyday of making beaded jewelry several years ago. She let me raid her supply and fill a couple boxes with colors that I thought would be useful.

same stuff, different background

I'm not really sure what in nature (if anything) some of these little gems might represent... other than maybe some larger Chironomids. I would consider most of them to be attractor patterns. I did make the lime green with the brown/black heads with the intention of imitating caddis pupae. I also tied a couple with Hungarian partridge soft hackle and a copper bead head. They're slightly more complicated than the all seed bead version, but they might still be simpler than Midgeman's "very simple little BH soft hackle caddis." I had no idea that he would be posting that right before I posted this... and I certainly have no desire to steal his thunder or compete with his impressive ties... but these seed bead flies really are simple.

Now I just need to get out and see what the trout think.

20 comments:

  1. I'll be interested to read what the trout think as I haven't tried bead flies like these yet. Certainly could "tie" quite a few in a short period.

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  2. hey I have those exact green in color. It is what I use to make my damsel in distress with on my blog. Also try your hand at some bead body scuds. Those are fun to tie. That green is really universal for a ton of patterns. Also look up the killer caddis. I have made some for friends and they are slaying brookies with them.

    Great Post

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  3. Pat, thanks for the comment. I'll let you know if they do anything good. They certainly were simple to "tie."

    Dustin, thanks for the tips. I'll check out your damsel, bead body scuds, and the "killer caddis." You've given me a ton of homework!

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  4. I like the looks of those...Very seedy! I will have to find me some...and yes, Dustin...damsels are often in distress! Ha.

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  5. RD, if you're looking for an easy entry into fly "tying" this could be your ticket.

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  6. In addition to tying some awesome-looking Caddis flies, we learned another use for glass beads. Bud Rowland at the GCC, used glass beads for making excellent eyes for saltwater flies, because they don't ever rust. Keep us posted on how your Caddis flies fish, especially the chartreuse ones! Nice job.

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  7. I'll be interested to see what likes these, because something will. Chartreuse is always good for a hook in or two.

    -stephanie

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  8. very nice. I raided my little sister's craft box and scored a lot of beads. The ones with an iridescent sheen can really give a lifelike appearance. Good work.

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  9. Dang those are nice, Jay. I know you tied these up with trout in mind, but I'm think they might nail some carp.

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  10. I think those would kill in Colorado. I've got some beads and I'll give it a try as well.

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  11. Thanks for all the comments. I'll let y'all know how they work sooner or later... probably later.

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  12. Jay
    Nice looking flies, which reminds me of the Firebug Midges. In fact I think these flies are better in that the sink rate would be faster. Clever idea to use the craft stuff, it goes to show you that most anything can produce a productive fly. First week in June is still on.

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  13. Bill, I had never seen Firebug Midges. I googled it, and they are... pretty. I'm sure they're productive fish catchers too... nothing wrong with presenting the fish a pretty fly to think about. Zebra midges seem to work when all else fails in a lot of places, and I'm sure the pretty ones would get the fishes' attention even better.

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  14. Cool Jay, get out there and test those out and let us know how you do. I have my own collection but maybe I'll let you do the R&D.

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  15. Like Dustin said, check out the killer caddis. It's one of my go-to flies now and it can make anything hungry. Orange is another good color for these beaders.

    Looking at your pic, I'm even getting the munchies.

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  16. FR, R & D is my specialty. I'm sort of a scientist ya know.

    LOAH, I've checked out the killer caddis. It might take a few more minutes than the all beaded version, but I think I'll probably make some soon. I've got some orange beads, but haven't used any yet. Thanks for the tips. By the way, don't eat the beads... no matter how much they look like candy.

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  17. Also look at some brown beads for the killer caddis as well!

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  18. Let me know how they work on Spring Creek and if the water ever goes down. The green would work well on Crane Creek I bet!

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  19. Hey jay, just wanted to let know and ask if I can feature you in my next blog shoutout

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  20. Dustin, I'd be delighted to be featured on the Fly Box. Thanks for thinking of me.

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